The Numero Group Explores Early ’80s L.A. Metal with ‘Bound For Hell: On The Sunset Strip’

The Sunset Strip – Numero Group, the frequently Grammy-nominated, Chicago-based label known for crafting expertly-researched collections featuring rarities, out-of-print and often forgotten musical sub-genres and artists, shine a spotlight on the halcyon days of early ‘80s Los Angeles glam metal with Bound For Hell: On The Sunset Strip.

A deep dive into the world of AquaNet and eyeliner, the 21-songs, spread across 2LPs, transport listeners, with music critic and co-author of Louder Than Hell: The Definitive Oral History of Metal, Katherine Turman, providing the road map via a 144-page, full color book. Amidst those pages, the story of how the scene unfurled, and eventually imploded, is told via first-hand testimonials, show flyers, and hundreds of photos, which come from the lens of acclaimed rock photographer Kevin Estrada. Estrada also serves as co-producer of the boxset.

Artists featured include scene heavyweights Armored Saint, Black ‘N Blue and Lizzy Borden, alongside long lost tracks from Reddi Killowatt, Angeles, Max Havoc, SIN, and Romeo. Bound For Hell: On The Sunset Strip also pays particular attention to the female musicians who challenged the testosterone-laden world of the Strip, with entries and recollections from Lisa Baker, Jaded Lady, Leather Angel, Hellion, and Bitch. “We were not pop girls, we really loved the aggression and the passion of hard rock music,” explains Leather Angel and Jaded Lady’s Terry O’Leary. “As a band, and especially as an all-girl band, you know, we came to conquer.”

The infamous Sunset Strip glam metal scene of the ‘80s is one that’s been covered excessively, and for a good reason. But usually, the analysis never goes too far past bands like Mötley Crüe, Poison, Quiet Riot, etc.,” explains Adam Luksetich, producer, and researcher behind the collection. “Our goal with Bound For Hell was to narrow in on the equally impressive independent or unsigned bands that thrived in that same scene but in most cases, never benefited from the major label feeding frenzy. With a bounty of unseen photos, pages and pages of flyers, and detailed liner notes, these bands get more time in the spotlight.”